Do These Pranks GO TOO FAR?

Do These Pranks GO TOO FAR?


JACOB SOBOROFF: What’s up, guys? Today is all about
pranks and whether or not they’ve gone too far. LIZZIE: Ye– MALE SPEAKER: Ohohoh! You just got pranked. JACOB SOBOROFF:
That’s not a prank. LIZZIE: No, that was assault. MALE SPEAKER: No,
this is a salt. LIZZIE: That is pepper. MALE SPEAKER: Is it? Oh, double prank! JACOB SOBOROFF: Get out of here. [MUSIC PLAYING] There’s a pretty major
YouTube prankster in the news right now. LIZZIE: Mhm. JACOB SOBOROFF: Sam Pepper went
to the Third Street Promenade, and he had a fake
arm that looked like his hand was in his pocket. But then with his real hand,
he would ask women questions to distract them, and then
reach over and grab their butts. Sam Pepper’s prank was
immediately taken down, but What’s Trending
posted this report on it. LIZZIE: He received a huge
backlash, immediately, on Twitter, and from a
bunch of different YouTubers calling it sexual abuse
because, of course. JACOB SOBOROFF:
Hank Green posted that he wouldn’t be
welcome at VidCon. LIZZIE: He did post another
video, basically saying that, like, oh, of course
sexual abuse is not OK. It’s not what I was doing. This was all scripted. And these people were actors. But I don’t believe him. JACOB SOBOROFF: It just
doesn’t make a lot of sense. LIZZIE: I just think this
clearly crosses the line. CARLY: We’ve seen what YouTube
pranks have evolved into, but now we’re going
back to the old [BLEEP]. MILES: Hahaha. What? CARLY: This has
27 million views. It was uploaded in 2006. [SCREAM] -Ahhhh! MILES: Stop banging the monitor. CARLY: So this video sparks
thousands of imitations. And one, a guy even punched
his hand through the monitor. [CHILD CRYING] MILES: Hehehehe. You’re crying. CARLY: Kids cry so ugly. MILES: I think he’s saying dad. Like confused, like
why would you do this? Right here. -(CRYING) Dahahad. MILES: Dahahad. The one man to
protect you, right? And then he puts it on YouTube. CARLY: Yeah. MILES: When I was
a kid, my grandpa used to scare the
[BLEEP] out of me. And I think it made
me a jumpy person. At least the scary maze prank
was a little bit more brief than this next prank. This is the mafia murder prank. This poor man in
the leather jacket, he thinks he’s just getting
a nice ride down the street. He was waiting at a bus
stop and talking to a guy. And he’s like, hey, my
buddy will take you. Let’s just hop in his
weird, nondescript Mercury. -Or like Cartoon Network
or something like that. [MUFFLED BANGING AND SCREAMING] -What is that? -Stay right here. MILES: Does this go too far? He tried to get out. But guess what, he couldn’t
because the child safety locks were on the door. CARLY: It’s not even a prank. MILES: You’ve got someone into
your car under false pretenses, then kept them from leaving. Kidnapping. Then you’ve terrorized them. I’m sure that’s
some other thing. Emotional al-Qaeda. CARLY: My least favorite
part is, weirdly enough, the end, when the
guy is like, prank. Can you sign this consent form
so I can use this footage? And the kid’s like, one, I’m
still in the middle of nowhere. -Feel better? -OK, yeah. -Yeah. We’ve got to take you
out to eat, like, buffet, or whatever you want, dude. All on me today. MILES: You like Pinkberry? Dude, come on. You like Pinkberry? Come on, buddy. ALEX: So if scary
pranks can go too far, can positive pranks go too far? EARNEST, SR: I think so. I know that they’re
very popular. But sometimes I love them. Sometimes I just feel
awkward watching them. -Because if you
want it bad enough, and I want it bad
enough to tip you more– -OK. – –if we just go like this– -Oh my god. – –your tip can
actually turn into $100. ALEX: The exploitation
is what gets me. This is a guy who paid
$400, effectively. And he got 3.4 million views and
has ad revenue running on this. So therefore he has
made much more money than he gave out, just
to exploit someone who is– I think it’s actually
a status thing, of saying, like, you lowly pizza
driver, I have this money. You need it. -That’s awesome. -It is pretty awesome. -I teared up. -Oh, no. Don’t. I’m sure you can use it. -Yeah, definitely. EARNEST, SR: I
was thinking of it as, for the five
minutes that they have to spend on the sidewalk,
they’re getting $100. So you got a night’s worth
of tips in one delivery. ALEX: There are 62,000
likes and only 726 dislikes. I might be in the wrong here. I’m not wrong. But people might
think I’m wrong. EARNEST, SR: You’re
a little wrong. ALEX: I don’t think I’m wrong. JACOB SOBOROFF: Since a lot
of what we’ve seen today deals with the invasion
of personal space, let’s look at a far less
offensive prank, if you even want to call it that. This was inspired by a reddit
post about a commuter sleeping on the shoulder of somebody
else on a New York City subway. LIZZIE: Mmmmm. Noooooo. JACOB SOBOROFF:
Kind of like this. At first, people
weren’t having it. Then, I guess, people
started to come around. It was made by the
marketing director of a nonprofit group
called Charidy, with a d. They basically help
nonprofits around the world get donations and
do things with them. That’s what I would have done. I would have just
probably popped up. LIZZIE: I really
don’t like this. JACOB SOBOROFF: Why? LIZZIE: This is framing it
as though the people who are, like, good people,
are the ones that allowed the invasion
of personal space of some strange bearded
man on the subway, leaning on my shoulder. Get off of me. JACOB SOBOROFF: I
mean, I don’t think it’s obviously on the same
scale as the Sam Pepper video. LIZZIE: No. Of course not. JACOB SOBOROFF: But do you
think it’s on that spectrum? LIZZIE: He’s not sexually
assaulting people with his head. I think it does live on the
same spectrum, to be honest. JACOB SOBOROFF: I
actually think that this shows that people are, for the
most part, caring and generous. LIZZIE: It doesn’t make
me a better person, I don’t think, to be like,
go ahead, sleep on me. So obviously, earlier we talked
about how Sam Pepper’s video, he came out saying that
it was to raise awareness for sexual abuse. But I feel like there’s
a better way to do that. And this video does it and
gives a really good idea of what it’s like
to be the recipient of unwanted attention. This is from Fousey. Basically, he noticed that
guys stare at women’s butts when they’re wearing yoga
pants, because yoga pants are a magical thing. But it doesn’t mean you get
to stare at them like that. And he decided to see what would
happen when he put on a pair. This video is his
biggest success. It’s got, like,
24 million views. -Ali, tell me when he looks, OK? Yo. Did you just stare at my butt? -No, man. -You just stared at my butt. -Why would I want to be
looking at your butt? -I felt your eyes
glaring at my butt. LIZZIE: This one’s my favorite. -Aw, man. Why the [BLEEP] do you
got on leggings, doo? -Why you staring
at my butt, doo? -Because I thought
you was a chick, doo. -I’m sorry, I though you were
a girl, so I was looking. -I thought you were a girl, man. LIZZIE: Isn’t this awesome? JACOB SOBOROFF: This
is pretty genius. LIZZIE: It is. And I think it got shared
for all the right reasons. And I think it’s fantastic. And I like that he bleeps things
out with Miley Cyrus’s face. -Why [BLEEP] you walking away? -Cause I want you to spank it. -[BLEEP]. LIZZIE: His experiments like
this get a ton of traffic. He’s actually been
discussed in college classes for social experiments like
this, which I think is great. JACOB SOBOROFF: Thank you
guys so much for watching. If you got any
questionable prank videos that you think we missed, drop
us a link in the comments. LIZZIE: Yeah, and
we also want to know what you think
about these, Where they great, terrible,
horrific, awesome? Let us know. JACOB SOBOROFF: We’ll
see you guys on Monday. But now to play us out with one
of the weirdest birthday prank videos you have ever
seen– play us out– LIZZIE AND JACOB: Katy Perry. [MUSIC- KATY PERRY, “BIRTHDAY”]