How To Adjust The Size of Women’s Pants Waists

How To Adjust The Size of Women’s Pants Waists


Here’s a fun pair of brightly-colored maroon pants and this is our challenge: The challenge is that we need to take the waist in, and how we’re going to do that is through the back seam here. Now the special part of the challenge is we don’t need to take in the entire back seam, just part way, just beyond the belt loop. First let’s get that belt loop off. So take your ripper and get it off how ever it is that you need to get it off. Almost released that belt loop. There she goes. Next we’ll need to figure out how we’re going to reduce this waistband. We’re going to have to make a seam here. It won’t matter because it will be nicely covered up by the belt loop by the time we’re finished. By the way, you’re going to want to remove the tags in back, too, because that’s where the seam is going to occur front and back. Sometimes the hardest part of the whole job is going to be getting the brand and care tags off, they’re sewn on so tightly, and I’m not going to opt to put it back on later, so I mentioning it now in case you want to, you do it later when you’re finished. I’ll try to remember to mention the best time to do it. Take your ruler, line it up with the seam, extend it beyond the waistband, and draw a chalk line. That’s going to be your new seam in the waistband. Transfer that chalk mark to the other side, stick a pin along the line, turn it over and mark along the way. Release that waistband a good ways from either side of your chalk mark, oh, a good couple inches. That seems kind of far but you’ll be glad when you go to put the waistband on later that you had enough room to move. Okay, see how we’ve got the waistband nicely detached. This will allow for the amount that we need to take it in and then some so that we have room to maneuver in here. Next thing to do is cut right along those chalk lines. Free up the seam that we’re going to work with from any stitching especially up here like so. Next we’ll actually take this seam in. Now turn the pants inside out with one leg inside the other so that it will be easy to access this seam. Here’s what I’ve chalk marked, very little going into the seam part of the pants. It’s the waistband that’s going to be taken in rather majorly. So I determined at her fitting that she needed a nice slant from the top of the waistband to the bottom of this rather wide waistband, and then here’s where it will meet up at the pants, okay? So I’m going to transfer this marking over here. Then we’ll be ready to sew. I won’t actually mark on the other side, I don’t need to. This is the side that’s going to be facing me when I sew. I’ll pin it and sew it. Take this to the machine now, run a fairly tight stitch, medium stitch, for security all along here. Allrighty! Stitched and now I want to take out this little bit of old stitching. And by the way, I stitched twice for security. Usually you can rip these out easily, these chain stitches, by having the seam facing upwards, nicking it with the seam ripper, and then you can kind of just pull on it and it will just rip right out. Sometimes it takes a little doing to get that started, but try it, you’re going to like it. Pull it until it stops, which is at the reinforcement of where I stopped and met with the original seam, then simply clip it. Pick it out from the other side and because they double stitched I need to get this one going, too. Let’s see if i can do it for you… Yay, it just went right away, cooperated beautifully. This is a good time to point out that naturally if more needed to be taken in the butt area you would have of course chalked a line that went deeper and more fully down towards the curve of the crotch. So just know at your fitting you determine really what all needs to be coming in or letting out, but in the case of these kinds of pants, you really cannot let out, so just know that. So here we are. We have to get these two parts together and then eventually we have to get these two parts together and then there will be a couple of steps after that, too. But for now, let’s get these two married up and follow your chalk line here, wrestle them together pin and stitch, get it under the machine and stitch. After that, we’ll take and wrestle these two together, once I’ve transferred the chalk mark from this one over to here, that steep slant and pin those together, and stitch those together. Looks awkward, but once you’ve sewn those two areas which are the waistband facing and the waistband, simply flip them into shape and you’re going to see how that’s going to match up very nicely. We’re not quite there yet, here’s what’s next. Next you’re going to want to trim the excess bulk, so trim down to about a quarter inch on both the facing and the waistband. Now nicely trimmed, the next thing would be to connect up at the top, the very top of the waistband, then we’ll address getting the bottom part of the waistband on to the pants. Definitely tight quarters here doing this part but flip it wrong side out and I like to work with the facing side facing me. I don’t care about these little plastic things sticking off, so I might just cut those off, but spread those narrow seam allowances now, match them up and pin them. The goal is to match these two seams that you made up now as nicely as possible, so back to inside-out, you’re pinned up, right? And here’s when I wish I had ripped out a little more on the sides here because I just can’t get in here enough, so that’s what I’m going to do, I’m going to rip back on each side a little further. Sometimes you just have to do a bunch of ripping of innocent areas in order to access the problem areas and then you have to get back and re-stitch the innocent areas, too. I’m going to be stitching just a short ways from here to here and, yes, I had to rip out quite a ways just to be able to get my hands in here and this turned wrong side out and then we’re going to have a nice result when we’re finished. And it turned out great and here’s why there’s no puckering. When you work with the facing side facing you, you can see where to start and stop better than if you were on the other side. Why? Because of this stitching where it ends makes kind of a little ridge that you can feel and see where it ends right here, and then you have the area to stitch over here to where you can kind of see it ridges a little differently. Now if you don’t see what I’m talking about, it’s okay. It takes experience, but some of you might see that as that great clue that I look for where to start and where to stop. Now I’ll run some stitching right along here to match up with the stitching from originally and that keeps the seam nicely down. Now all that remains is getting the waistband on to the pants and then the waistband facing onto the pants. I believe I want to work with the waistband side facing me. I’m going to match up these two seams. I didn’t really steam press this little bit open like I would have with a bigger seam had we gone deeper into the butt, grab a pin, match these up. This is how it’s looking this time around. I did not have to feel for a ridge like I was trying to describe before. It all feels the same. It’s working out great! There may be just the slightest crimp right here, but because I’m going to be stitching in the ditch here pretty soon and placing this belt loop back on, I don’t think it’s going to show. Oh! Also, before we do the next step, this is where if you want to put the care tag and the brand tag back on, do it now, stick them on there evenly, sew them on. Stitching in the ditch is just that, it’s all about stitching right in the ditch where the waistband meets the pants. All that remains is getting the belt loop on. And I’m going to just topstitch it on into place at the top and bottom. All finished then, and it’s going to look so smooth over her back side. Good job!