OSHO Dynamic Meditation – A Closer Look – First Stage

OSHO Dynamic Meditation – A Closer Look – First Stage


presents Dr. John Andrews OSHO Dynamic Meditation- – A Closer Look – First Stage Hello everybody We are going to go through Osho Dynamic Meditation. And I am not going to be focusing on all the regular instructions. We will mention everything but particularly we want to look at the areas that are quite complicated, quite difficult or easy to misunderstand or don’t get presented very well – so that you really benefit from this meditation. So when you hear the instructions: let’s say you hear the instructions which begin with “this is a meditation in which you have to be continuously conscious, alert and aware in all the three stages. And then you hear something about the breathing which is quite complicated and not like any breathing that people regularly do at all. Then you hear there is 10 minutes of going completely crazy which definitely gets your attention. And then there is 10 minutes of jumping up and down on the flats of your feet with your hands in the air, again a pretty unusual maneuver and then there is a freeze and then there is 15 minutes of just standing frozen and then there is 15 minutes of dance and celebration. And when you hear all that, one thing which is pretty likely is whatever that conscious, alert and aware business was right at the beginning has long gone out of the window. So I just want you to listen to Osho explaining that particular part. “So this first meditation is a meditation in which you have to be continuously alert, conscious, aware, whatsoever you do. The first step, breathing; the second step, catharsis; the third step, the mantra, mahamantra “Hoo.” But remain a witness. Don’t get lost. It is easy to get lost. While you are breathing you can forget; you can become so much one with breathing that you can forget the witness. But then you miss the point. Breathe as fast, as deep as possible, bring your total energy to it, but you still remain a witness. Observe it what is happening as if you are just a spectator, as if the whole thing is happening to somebody else, as if the whole thing is happening in the body and the consciousness is just centered and looking. This witnessing has to be carried in all the three steps. And when everything stops, and in the fourth step you have become completely inactive, frozen, then this alertness will come to its peak. Osho, A Bird on the Wing, # 1 So the key phrase there is “but then you miss the point”. So this is like the basis of this whole meditation. The second difficulty often is the breathing. Now, the breathing can be regular or the breathing could be regularly irregular or it could be irregularly irregular which is exactly what is required for this first 10 minutes. Absolutely irregularly irregular without any rhythm or pattern at all. And that is absolutely crucial. And we will explain the details of that in a minute. Now let’s just say it is tomorrow morning. It is 6 o’clock and there you are. It’s a little early, it’s dark. You are a bit woozy, and you are waiting there and then the music starts off you go breathing away, breathing away and then suddenly you remember “jeez, what did that guy say? Oh irregularly irregular, right ok” and then you start remembering and you breath irregularly, irregularly which you manage to keep up for a full 10 seconds before you fall back into a coma and now you are breathing totally regularly again like a steam engine. That is quite tricky. Now when you ask yourself “how on earth am I going to be able to breathe irregularly irregularly for 10 whole minutes?” Only one possible way and that is to be conscious, alert and aware. Both of these issues absolutely fit together. You cannot have one without the other. And Osho explains about these active meditations that they are like changing gear in a car. You go to the max in the first gear and then the second gear and then the third gear. Each stage or stages depends on the stage or stages that went before. So everything depends on this first 10 minutes. And you can see, when it says irregularly irregularly the word everybody hears is chaotic. Now chaotic does not translate in many languages exactly as irregularly irregularly. You can stand in front of the mirror and you can breathe irregularly irregularly and it may not look very chaotic at all. And conversely, you can stand in front of the mirror and give a very chaotic performance and actually you are breathing regularly. So if you are breathing irregularly irregularly that means the breathing is as chaotic as possible. So the rest of the chaos comes from the natural body movements. Use your body to generate the maximum amount of chaos. That is what the irregularly irregularly breathing is intended to do. So let us look at what this is all about. Why is this important? What is going on? So you may have noticed that when you get into a stage you get angry, you get upset, you get miserable, you get delighted, you get excited – whatever it is – you may have noticed that your breathing takes on a particular pattern for you for that particular state. And that is an indication of the extent to which the mind and the breathing are habitually locked together essentially because of our conditioning. Locked together. So if we take the mind sort of figuratively like that, then everyone seems to agree that about 10 % of the mind is the so called conscious mind and 90 % is unconscious. And you can think of the conscious mind as being filled with all the things your mum and dad hoped that the neighbors thought was true about you. All the things that you are proud of and you are happy about and you want everyone to think is true about you and all those wonderful thinks about you. That gets left in the conscious mind. But what about all the other stuff? The naughty stuff, the bad stuff, the stuff you are ashamed about, the stuff you definitely don’t want the neighbors to find out about? All that kind of stuff you are guilty about, all the stuff you have forgotten, neglected, ignored? All that gets put in the unconscious. So, there is a barrier between the conscious and the unconscious which makes the unconscious unconscious, invisible, unless we discover how to go there and find out what is there. Normally it is there is a wall between the two. Like a Berlin wall. which is very compassionate because when someone says “how are you today” and you kind of go “I’m fine thanks… kind of” it is sort of genuine because actually we haven’t a clue what is in the unconscious. If we really knew what is in the unconscious and someone says “how are you today”, the answer would be very different. Now what is really interesting about this is the unconscious actually gets a very bad rap. When you think of it the unconscious takes care of your breathing, your heart rate, your digestion, your immunity, you know some pretty important issues – almost like the best friend you ever had. And the reason the unconscious gets a bad rap is because it is in the “left luggage” business. Because the conscious mind, whenever it comes across something it really does not want to deal with and does not want to look at and is embarrassed about and ashamed about, dumps it into the unconscious. But what is really important to understand is the unconscious has no interest in keeping all this stuff down here. Also you can look at the unconscious like a really bright 12 year old kid who’s only job is to take care of you and all your vital functions. And the unconscious has no context. It does not know the world it is in. All it knows is whatever it gets from the conscious mind. So, here is the unconscious going “jeez, what the hell is this doing here, right in the middle of the corridor blocking all the flow? Well I guess she knows what she is doing and my job is just to take care of it”. But what is really critical is this unconscious mind has no interest in keeping this here at all. This unconscious mind would love to get rid of it. And the reason it stays down there is because of the energy of this guy in the conscious mind who definitely does not want any of that stuff coming to the surface because I like to pretend to everyone that I am completely normal and a nice happy chap, right and I don’t want any of that stuff coming to the surface so I exert a lot of effort, my whole life trying to make sure that none of that nasty stuff comes to the light of day. Huge effort, effort, effort, a pretense. Pretending that we are normal and everything is fine thank you. So, given the extent that the mind and the breathing are so habitually tied together. If we could cause enough chaos in the body and the breathing what happens is this guy completely loses the plot. So this guy who is being busy all the time pretending how normal you are actually then is no longer able to keep up the job, completely loses it, does not know if it is Monday or Friday, can no longer guard the Berlin wall, at which point whatever is in the unconscious can now simply come to the surface. Just as the unconscious would love to see it all go, he is happy that it is all disappearing, he does not want it there, this guy is no longer able to hold it down so naturally whatever is there can now come to the surface. That is why that first 10 minutes is so critical as a doorway to the second 10 minutes, the catharsis. You get that breathing to be as deep and as fast and is as irregularly irregularly as you possibly can using your body movements to support every possible amount of chaos, what you are doing is getting rid of this guy so that whatever is in the unconscious can now happily come to the surface during the second stage. O.K? Clear? Interesting eh? So now we will just play a demonstration of the first stage with the basic instructions. The First stage: 10 minutes Breathing chaotically through the nose, let breathing be intense, deep, fast, without rhythm, with no pattern – and concentrating always on the exhalation. The body will take care of the inhalation. The breath should move deeply into the lungs. Do this as fast and as hard as you possibly can until you literally become the breathing. Use your natural body movements to help you to build up your energy. Feel it building up, but don’t let go during the first stage. Did anyone notice an apparent contradiction between what Osho is saying and the instructions? So the instructions say you “breathe as deep, as fast so you literally become one with the breathing” and Osho is saying “you can become one with the breathing so much that you can forget the witness”. Tricky. So you really have to turn up for this meditation and there are lots of tricky elements to it. The Second Stage Continues For more information including details of webinars on meditation and other OSHO-related topics, please contact:
[email protected] John Andrews was Osho’s personal physician, taking care of his body for many years including his final days. As a meditator and scientist for many decade, John Andrews enjoyed following, and writing about, the gradual acceptance of meditation by the scientific community turn into the current flood of interest. He now writes about the final step into an individual journey without end. As Osho explains, it is “an open experiment”, where, “Any truth that may come later on can be absorbed by this system without any conflict”. Now we can move easily from what is often confusing plethora of different approaches to the simple, clear and practical approach to meditation by Osho – the first major upgrade in discovering how to be conscious in twenty-five centuries ! Copyright©2016 OSHO International Foundation
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