Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis


– My name is Mike Parsons. Today, I’m gonna talk about osteoporosis. (What is osteoporosis?) Simply put, osteoporosis
is bone that’s less dense, therefore, more weak than typical bone. Osteoporosis is a silent disease. We’ve all spoken with people that say they’re shorter
than they used to be. Do you have history of a fracture? Have you fallen down and broken something? Most of us should be able to
fall down and not break bones. One in two women will have a
fragility fracture over age 50. A quarter of all men will have a fragility fracture over age 50. There’s also risk factors. Do you smoke? Are you of small build? Are you Caucasian or Asian? These are all risk factors. Other risk factors can
include use of steroids. They can weaken the bone. Have you taken proton pump inhibitors? Do you have thyroid issues? Have you ever taken medications
that contain aluminum? Other risk factors include a
history of thyroid disease, weight-loss surgery, rheumatoid arthritis, depression and premature menopause. So who gets osteoporosis? Do you have a family
history of osteoporosis? Did your mom have osteoporosis? Did someone in your
family break a bone early? Do you have a sedentary lifestyle? All of these things can help add to your risk for osteoporosis. How do you prevent osteoporosis? You take calcium and vitamin D. You get regular weight-bearing exercise, stop smoking, don’t drink in excess, and talk to your healthcare provider. (How do you diagnose osteoporosis?) Diagnoses of osteoporosis
is fairly simple. Either you have history
of a fragility fracture, or you have a DEXA scan. DEXA scans tell us the
density of your bone and whether you have normal bone, osteopenia, or osteoporosis. Osteopenia is in between normal
bone and osteoporotic bone. (What medical interventions are available?) Anything other than a normal
result with your DEXA scan, you should talk with your
primary care provider or your specialist about
intervening with different things that we can do to help you
with your bone density. These can include lifestyle modifications, weight-bearing exercise, for example. You can also start on medications that can help you out
with your bone density. So osteoporosis is far common
than we typically think. It is life threatening as well. If you have a history of a fracture or even you have risk factors, you need to talk to your
primary care provider, or you can come see me at
the spine center at EIRMC. (EIRMC.com)