Patanjali Yoga Sutra Chant: Samadhi Pada

Patanjali Yoga Sutra Chant: Samadhi Pada


Through Yoga the Chitta, through
grammar the language,
and through medicine the physical body | who among all those Sages handed this
over
I respectfully bow to Patanjali Now, the teachings of yoga. Now, the teachings of yoga. Yoga is to still the patterning of
consciousness. Then, pure awareness can abide in its
very nature. Otherwise, awareness takes itself to be
the patterns of consciousness. There are five types of patterns,
including both hurtful and benign They are right perception,
misperception, conceptualization, deep
sleep, and remembering Right perception arises from direct
observation, inference, or the words of
others. Misperception is false knowledge, not
based on what actually is Conceptualization derives from linguistic
knowledge, not contact with real things Deep sleep is a pattern grounded in the
perception that nothing exists Remembering is the retention of
experiences. Both practice and non-reaction are
required to still the patterning of
consciousness. Practice is the sustained effort to rest in
that stillness. And this practice becomes firmly rooted
when it is cultivated skillfully and
continuously for a long
time. As for non-reaction, one can recognize
that it has been fully achieved when no
attachment arises in regard to anything at all, whether
perceived directly or learned. When the ultimate level of non-reaction
has been reached, pure awareness can
clearly see itself as independent from the fundamental
qualities of nature. At first, the stilling process is
accompanied by four kinds of cognition:
analytical thinking, insight,
bliss, or feeling like a self Later, after one practices steadily to
bring all thought to a standstill, these
four kinds of cognition fall away, leaving only a store of latent
impressions in the depth memory. Once the body is gone, and these latent
impressions are dissolved in nature, they
are inclined to be reborn For all others, faith, energy, mindfulness,
integration, and wisdom form the path to
realization For those who seek liberation
wholeheartedly, realization is near. How near depends on whether the
practice is mild, moderate, or intense. Realization may also come if one is
oriented toward the ideal of pure
awareness, Isvara. Isvara is a distinct, incorruptible form of
pure awareness, utterly independent of
cause and effect, and lacking any store of latent impressions. Its independence makes this awareness
an incomparable source of omniscience. Existing beyond time, Isvara was also
the ideal of the ancients. Isvara is represented by a sound, om. Through repetition its meaning becomes
clear Then, interiorization develops and
obstacles fall away. Sickness, apathy, doubt, carelessness,
laziness, hedonism, delusion, lack of
progress, and inconstancy are all distractions which, by stirring up
consciousness, act as barriers to
stillness. When they do, one may experience
distress, depression, or the inability to
maintain steadiness of
posture or breathing. One can subdue these distractions by
working with any one of the following
principles of practice Consciousness settles as one radiates
friendliness, compassion, delight, and
equanimity toward all things, whether pleasant or painful, good
or bad. Or by pausing after breath flows in or
out. Or by steadily observing as new
sensations materialize. Or when experiencing thoughts that are
luminous and free of sorrow. Or by focusing on things that do not
inspire attachment. Or by reflecting on insights culled from
sleep and dreaming. Or through meditative absorption in any
desired object. One can become fully absorbed in any
object, whether vast or infinitesimal. As the patterning of consciousness
subsides, a transparent way of seeing,
called coalescence, saturates consciousness; like a jewel, it reflects
equally whatever lies before it – whether
subject, object, or act
of perceiving. So long as conceptual or linguistic
knowledge pervades this transparency,
it is called coalescence with thought At the next stage, called coalescence
beyond thought, objects cease to be
colored by memory; now formless, only their essential nature
shines forth. In the same way, coalesced
contemplation of subtle objects is
described as reflective or reflection-free. Subtle objects can be traced back to
their origin in undifferentiated nature. These four kinds of coalescence – with
thought, beyond thought, reflective,
reflection-free – are called integration that bears seeds of latent
impressions In the lucidity of coalesced, reflection-
free contemplation, the nature of the self
becomes clear. The wisdom that arises in that lucidity is
unerring Unlike insights acquired through
inference or teachings, this wisdom has
as its object the actual distinction between pure awareness and
consciousness. It generates latent impressions that
prevent the activation of other
impressions. When even these cease to arise, and
the patterning of consciousness is
completely stilled, integration bears no further seeds.