Peak Pose Yoga Sequence With Vajrasana (Thunderbolt Pose): Yoga For Feet And Ankles – Part I

Peak Pose Yoga Sequence With Vajrasana (Thunderbolt Pose): Yoga For Feet And Ankles – Part I


Namaste everyone from Tummee.com, yoga
platform for yoga teachers and yoga teachers in training. In today’s video we
will cover how to create a yoga sequence around a peak pose. A peak pose is the
primary pose around which you plan the yoga sequence and in today’s video we
cover Thunderbolt pose as the peak pose or Vajrasana. Now if we were to ask you
how to create a sequence around Thunderbolt pose how
would you go about it? Is there a method that you would follow before you even
begin to create the yoga sequence? It is very important as yoga teachers to
practice the pose while keeping your students’ flexibility and ability in
mind while also identifying the different muscles involved, the joints
involved and also getting an overall feel of how the body is, while in the pose.
So let’s just first get down to Vajrasana making notes while here we know
that the lower body is fairly active when compared to the torso. This also
involves keeping your back straight which comes with only if you have hip
stability and we also know that while the lower body is active, the main
stress is at the ankles and the knees. So having made these notes it will help
us now understand how to organize the warm-up poses. So we have chosen 12 such poses as part of the warm-up starting from our toes right up
to the hips which involves the entire lower body. Now how do you know or how
should you go about organizing these poses. Now we know that Varjasana when practiced it we know that there
was some stress on the knees and the ankles and we know most students would find this part of the body to be
the challenge. So keeping that in mind, the reason why this could happen is
because of seated long hours in front of the desk or it would be the day to day activities that reduce the range of motion of their ankles and
knees. Therefore it is best to start from your toes moving upwards to your hips in
which that’s the order we have chosen here so we start first with the dynamic
flow of variation of Mountain Pose here so students just can bounce up and
down on their toes and back into the heels,
going into the variation of downward facing dog pose again this is done in a
dynamic way working equally on both sides of the hips here while we are
opening up the ankles then going into a static position, another
variation of downward facing dog where here you are focusing on how the
body feels and also opening up the back of the knees so you can request your
students to stay here for longer and by now I mean right from the toes we have
moved down to the knees here so they should be comfortable holding it
for a little longer. From here, we move down to a variation of Garland pose where
it kind of also is a relaxing pose after working on the ankles because not all
students would be comfortable to go beyond this, so, we actually come down to a
resting pose while also teaching your students to connect to how they feel
right now while seated here. Are the knees still tight? Are their
ankles tight? Are their hips okay? From here, we move on to a seated position
opening up the ankles moving clockwise and anti-clockwise. This really helps in increasing the range of motion of the ankles. From here we move we know
the firelog pose, a great hip opener, it helps us to even work on bringing
stability on both sides both hips and you can even ask your students to bounce
the hips over here which again keeping awareness of their ankles and knees.
Another variation of opening the hips but here our focus is the ankles and the
knees so you can request the students to be aware of how the knee
feels and how the hip feels and also very important note that you work on
both sides equally so that you bring stability. While doing this you finally
come into a variation of bound angle pose. This is a symmetrical pose which
talks about equal attention to both sides of the body the right as well as
the left. It also gives them the feeling of how they are feeling after warming up right from their toes you’re actually resting your ankles here right
from the toes moving to the hips and stability in the hips. Another
challenging pose we take here is the toe balance just to give a feel to the
students as to where they are right now with their practice. Can the ankles take
the weight of the hips already or does it require some more warmup, so more students
may need more or some students may be ready. From here, we come back into the
garland pose which we did earlier. The reason while here you can request
your students to kind of connect to what they felt here and how they’re feeling
right now here, are they any different if there are any different then we know
that they need more warmup or if they’re feeling comfortable and stable then
we know they’re almost there and it is kind of good as a warm-up. A slight
variation here we’re talking about a deeper opening of the ankles or the
deeper opening of the lower leg muscles which is again just a kind of getting a
sense of comfort and sense of confidence with their lower body. So we have covered
these twelve warm-up poses and forming the first part to peak pose yoga
sequences and in a nutshell what we covered today is talking about
practicing the pose in this case we practiced with Vajrasana. We
made notes identified those twelve poses, identified
the warm-up poses, in this case we identified 12 of them. Pause for a moment
here to rewind, to see and reconnect to what was just explained. Hope you enjoyed
and learned the structure to follow with regard to this Thunderbolt pose as the
peak pose. In our next video, we will cover the actual practice of Thunderbolt pose
along with its variations and the cooldown and the counter pose for the
same. Drop in your comments and see you soon. From all of us
namaste from Tummee.com, a Yoga platform for yoga teachers and yoga teachers in
training