The $1495 Workout Mirror: What to Know Before Buying

The $1495 Workout Mirror: What to Know Before Buying


– I’m Ingrid Skjong, and today we are taking a look at Mirror. (upbeat music) Even if you don’t follow fitness, you’ve probably come
across this high design, high-tech piece of equipment
in your social media feeds, or on ads seemingly everywhere. But what exactly is it? Mirror is a smart mirror
that streams both on-demand and live fitness classes
from a companion app so you can workout at home. That might not sound so novel, but Mirror puts its
instructor front and center, along with your own reflection. Kind of like taking a
private class every time. Workouts include cardio,
yoga, bar, boxing, Pilates, strength and stretching
in levels one beginner, to four advanced. There are more than 70 live classes a week and a hefty collection
of on-demand options. Why is it so popular? If there’s one thing the fitness
world loves it’s a trend, and Mirror is one of several
brands, hello Peloton, that has capitalized on two. The increasing popularity
of connected fitness and the rise of boutique fitness studios. Mirror already has a competitor in fact, called the Echelon Reflect,
which we’re also testing. Connected fitness refers to
streamed on-demand workouts done at home that allow for everything a brick and mortar studio offers. Like the ability to follow
a favorite instructor, or a live group workouts
that foster a community feel, minus all travel and
scheduling constraints. And boutique fitness studios are giving traditional
gyms a run for their money. Boutique studios like
Orangetheory, Barry’s Bootcamp, and barre3 took 40% of fitness industry market share in 2017. And from 2013 to 2017, the number of people holding memberships to boutique studios rose by 121%. So what is it exactly like to use Mirror? The Mirror app is your home base where you can browse workout
types and choose a class. You’ll see what equipment you’ll need, what exercises you’ll do, what order you’ll do them
in, and for how long. You can also read instructor bios so you know exactly who
you’re dealing with. During a workout your
instructor is right there with your own reflection, which can take a beat
or two to get used to. Mirror has its own music stations and also supports Spotify Premium. You can adjust the volume of the music and the volume of the
instructor independently depending on who you
want to hear more from. And as you workout the screen
displays a countdown clock, calories burned, and if the Bluetooth heart
rate monitor is connected, real-time heart rate data. It also shows the names of
other people taking the class, whether the workout is live or on-demand. Instructors have access to
your profile, heart rate data, and class milestones,
and they give shout outs, so if you’re in a live
class you might get one. At the end of it all you get the chance to take
a congratulatory selfie. (camera snaps) One-on-one personal training via a camera at the top of the Mirror, will debut later this year. A lens cap is provided so
you can close off that window into your world at will. Mirror is attractive,
it operates seamlessly, has solid programming,
and is pretty fun to use. It’s not however cheap, you’ll pay $1495 for the Mirror, which
includes resistance bands, a heart rate monitor, and
a screen cleaning kit. $250 for setup and delivery, and $39 a month for the
subscription. That comes to $2213. (cash register chimes) So you’re looking at nearly
$200 a month for the first year, compare that to roughly $52, which is the national average cost of a monthly gym membership,
and it’s an investment. But as we all know, sometimes you can’t or don’t want to leave home to workout, and group classes or one-on-one training can be incredibly motivating. So we can see why owning a Mirror or some other piece of
connected fitness equipment, may be worthwhile. But whether it makes sense for you depends on your particular
situation and goals. We’re just getting started here, so stay tuned for wirecutter’s
full review of Mirror, coming soon. Me? Oh my god he’s hamming it up he’s like (laughs) Stop making direct eye contact while you’re going spread eagle. (laughs)