The First Sanskrit Lesson- Mastery of Sound(Check Point)

The First Sanskrit Lesson- Mastery of Sound(Check Point)


In our previous video we took a comprehensive
look at the first set of Sanskrit Sounds called Swaras. We learnt how they are produced, how to utter
them, why they are arranged the way they are,their manifestations in the human body and their
significance in spiritual practices. In this video, let’s do a similar exploration
of the next set of Sanskrit sounds called as vyanjanas. By the end of this video, we’d have completed
our first step into the world of Sanskrit learning, and would be fully equipped with
the tools necessary to start speaking the language in our next video. The Sanskrit Channel is an effort to explore
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below. vyanjanas are those sounds of Sanskrit language,
which are produced with a special effort by the organs of the vocal cavity. Unlike swaras, they are not inherent sounds. Similar to swaras, there are different ways
of categorizing them for further study. One of such ways is shown here. As you see, there are 35 vyanjanas in sanskrit,
which are grouped into different sections, denoted by various sanskrit names. Before we learn how to utter these sounds
correctly, let’s explore the logic behind this kind of categorization. The first 25 sounds are called as sparshAH. These are produced when there is a contact,
or a touch, sparsha between two parts of the vocal cavity. The last few are called as UShmaNaH.These
are produced by blowing out air in different formations, and the intermediary sounds between
them are called as antasthAH. These are categorized further based on the
amount of air, or prANa which is used to utter them. There are alpa prANAH which use lesser amount
of air, and mahA prANAH which use more amount of air. Each row, or varga is denoted with it’s first
letter, and is associated with a specific organ of the vocal cavity from which all of
them emanate, like kanthaH=throat, tAluH=back of the palate, mUrdhA=roof of the
mouth, dantAH=teeth, and Oshtau=both the lips. There is a group of sounds at the end of each
varga, called as anunAsikAs which are pronounced with the help of nAsikA, or the nose. I just mentioned these terms, to present how
systematic this scheme of organisation is. One need not memorise these terms or even
know them in order to speak the language. And as i said before, this is just one of
the many ways we can organise the sanskrit alphabet. What is more important, is that you know how
to utter these sounds clearly. There are a lot of common mistakes people
commit when uttering these sounds. Especially sounds like nga, nja, and pha. I’ll now utter all these sounds in this particular
order, and give a short pause after each sound. You can try and utter these sounds after me
and check if you have been pronouncing these sounds correctly. It also helps to consciously focus on that
particular area of the mouth when uttering these sounds. Let’s get started. ka, kha, ga, gha, nga
ca, cha, ja, jha, nja Ta, Tha, Da, Dha, Na
ta, tha, da, dha, na pa, pha, ba, bha, ma
ya, ra, la, va, sha, Sha, sa, ha Now there is another sound La, which is very
commonly used in the spiritual practices, but is not very commonly used in Sanskrit
language and literature. There are also sounds which are just a combination
of multiple vyanjanas, but are practiced along with them because they are used very often
in language. They are kSha, tra, jna, and shra. Many of the Indian regional languages follow
this same system of alphabet organisation with slight variations based on the commonly
used or omitted sounds in that particular language. These set of 35 sounds are also found in the
lower 5 chakras of the human body. 4 are located at the mulAdhAra, 6 at svAdhiShThAna,
10 at maNipUraka, 12 at anAhata, and 3 at AjnA. Each of these sounds are also associated with
specific deities and form an integral part of some of the most powerful mantras. The panchadashI mantra is a classic example
of this. Now that we have learnt how to utter the sounds
of Sanskrit correctly, in the next video, we are going to start learning few simple
sanskrit words which are enough to hold a complete coversation. Many of you have asked me to recommend the
best book or video to start learning Sanskrit language. The best way to aquire this skill is not through
books or videos, it is through a handful of friends who are interested in speaking the
language with each other. Make sure you share these two videos with
those who wish to learn Sanskrit with you, and by next video, let’s all start making
small talk together! If you wish to support the production of more
videos like these, consider becoming a sponsor on patreon, or make a one time contribution,
all through the links in the description below. Alos, consider subscribing to the Sanskrit
channel, where we explore hidden gems, in the Vast world of diverse sanskrit literature. See you in the next video, namaskaram